Clouds Like Honeycomb

NOAA-led team uses an innovative network approach to explain polygonal patterns in clouds University of Colorado at Boulder Polygons are widespread in nature: Drying mud may crack into many-sided blocks, and bees shape honeycomb into regular, six-sided cells. Hexagons also appear in broad sheets of clouds across parts of Earth's oceans, and now a team of researchers has used a network approach …

Caribbean Beekeeper Training – Barbados

You're invited to the 5th Annual Caribbean Bee College At the University of West Indies, Cave Hill Campus in Wanstead, Barbados November 1st - 4th, 2017 Hosted by the University of Florida Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab Click here to register or for more information Two Days of Training November 3rd and 4th will be the main training days for beekeepers and bee enthusiasts looking …

Pollen Stays on Bee Bodies Right Where Flowers
Need it For Pollination

Ungroomed sites correspond with flower pollen-sacs and stigmas PLOS After grooming, bees still have pollen on body parts that match the position of flower pollen-sacs and stigmas, according to a study published September 6, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Petra Wester from Heinrich-Heine-University, Germany, and colleagues. Flowers depend on pollen for pollination, and flower-visiting bees collect large quantities of pollen …

Honey Bees Become Workers or Queens Depending on
the Plant MicroRNAs in Their Diet

Certain plant microRNAs slow development to keep workers small and sterile PLOS Working model for the cross-kingdom transfer of plant microRNAs in the regulation of honeybee development. For larvae that are destined to become queens, royal jelly is fed in copious amounts to drive the development of the royal phenotype. For worker-destined larvae, substantial quantities of plant microRNAs are absorbed when consuming beebread and pollen, which …

The Future of Agriculture is Center Stage
at Ag Innovation Showcase

Bees, new food sources and machine learning are leading trends Los Angeles, CA and St. Louis, MO – August 30, 2017 - Trained bees that pollinate specific target crops, snacks that make eating bugs more of a novelty, and sugar without the guilt or health issues and sensing technologies that give real-world advice to farmers are just a few disruptive innovations …

BIP National Loss Survey Comparison with NASS Results

Courtesy of Bee Informed Partnership   The National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) recently reported the results of its second honey bee colony loss survey. The Bee Informed Partnership (BIP) also recently published preliminary loss results covering the same period. Despite the differences in methodology and sample sizes, these two surveys yielded comparable results. Specifically, we estimate 33.23% losses based on the BIP survey, …

Varroa Mites – Bees’ Archenemies –
Have Genetic Holes in Their Armor

Michigan State University   EAST LANSING, Mich. - Seemingly indestructible Varroa mites have decimated honeybee populations and are a primary cause of colony collapse disorder, or CCD. Michigan State University scientists have found genetic holes in the pests' armor that could potentially reduce or eliminate the marauding invaders. The team's results, published in the current issue of Insect Science, have identified four …

Neonics Put Bumblebees at Risk of Extinction by Hindering Colony Formation, Study Reveals

University of Guelph professor discovered that exposure to thiamethoxam reduces the chances of a bumblebee queen starting a new colony by more than a quarter. University of Guelph Bumblebees are less able to start colonies when exposed to a common neonicotinoid pesticide, according to a new University of Guelph study. Prof. Nigel Raine has discovered that exposure to thiamethoxam reduces the chances of a …