International Trade Commission Votes to Continue Anti-dumping Duties Placed on Chinese Honey

The International Trade Commission voted Monday, Nov. 19, to continue anti-dumping duties on Chinese imported honey.  After testimony presented earlier, the Commission decided that "removing the tariffs would likely hurt the domestic industry." "The commission voted 5-0 to maintain the protective measures on Chinese honey following a second sunset review to determine whether U.S. honey producers still needed the duties. Domestic …

Trade Groups Push U.S. to Keep Chinese Honey Tariffs

Two U.S. honey trade organizations urged regulators last week to maintain tariffs on Chinese honey, warning the U.S. International Trade Commission that revoking an existing anti-dumping order on the products would have a harmful impact on the domestic industry, according to a story written by Django Gold, Law 360, last week. Gold wrote, "The American Honey Producers Association and the Sioux …

U.S. Trade Commission to Review Chinese Honey Tariffs

INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Investigation No. 731-TA-893 (Second Review) HONEY FROM CHINA Scheduling of an expedited five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on honey from China. AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling of an expedited review pursuant to section 751(c)(3) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. ' 1675(c)(3)) (the Act) to determine whether …

Apivar® (Amitraz) Approved for Varroa Control in South Dakota

Several Other States Expect Approval Soon The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a Section 18 approval for Apivar® (amitraz) use in beehives to control varroa mites in South Dakota, the original requesting state. A number of other states have also requested similar approvals that are pending. South Dakota's original request for a special Section 18 permit was made in 2010. …

Secrets of the Honey Bee Bite Revealed: A Previously Unknown Honey Bee Defense Weapon Against Varroa and a Potential New Natural Anesthetic for Humans

Researchers have discovered that honey bees can bite as well as sting and that the bite contains a natural anesthetic. The anesthetic may not only help honey bees fend off pests such as wax moth and the parasitic varroa mite, but it also has great potential for use in human medicine. The surprise findings discovered by a team of researchers from …